Saturday, May 19, 2012

[Deep Inhale] Real Illustre y Fervorosa Hermandad del Santísimo Sacramento y Archicofradia de Nazarenos de la Sagrada Expiración de nuestro Señor Jesucristo y María Santísima de las Aguas

One of the nearby brotherhoods, officially known as the "Real Illustre y Fervorosa Hermandad del Santisimo Sacramento y Archicofradia de Nazarenos de la Sagrada Expiración de nuestro Señor Jescucristo y María Santísima de las Aguas," more readily known as "Hermandad del Museo" (or the "Museum Brotherhood") has its Cruz de Mayo events this weekend. The Cruces de Mayo are the "May Crosses," of which there are a number around the city. They appear to be an outgrowth of the pagan ritual of the Maypole. There are small processions and special events throughout the month.

THE CROSS OF THE MUSEUM BROTHERHOOD. EARLY FRIDAY EVENING.

ARRANGING THE TABLES AND CHAIRS, AND SETTING UP THE SALES TENT.

Last night the Museum Brotherhood hosted a fund-raiser, concert, and dinner in the plaza in front of their chapel and meeting hall, which is next door to the Museum of Fine Arts. This evening, there will be a mini-procession and presentations involving children of the members of the Brotherhood.

BANDA DEL SOL.

FOOD AND DRINKS TICKETS WERE SOLD FROM THE TENT, ALONG WITH TOYS AND GIFTS.

Last night's concert performance was by the Banda del Sol (Band of the Sun) from the musical association "Nuestra Señora del Sol" (Our Lady of the Sun). It was pasodoble music, which is marching music — John Philip Sousa, Spanish style. The band is well-known here but, unless there's a parade along with it, marching music is not my cup of tea or, in this case, my glass of sangria.

MÚSICA DEL SOL.

21 comments:

  1. I love scratching Catholicism to find the pagan underpinnings. I read history and boo into the book (OK, mentally not verbally) every time another Roman library was burned or a great and famous temple was dismantled to build a church. We lost so much knowledge and fantastic architecture in the suppression of the Greco-Roman culture. There's something so wonderful about the Mediterranean acceptance of the human need for revelry, sensuality, joyous excess --and, yes, sex -- as a legitimate part of life!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will:
      It is fascinating to find the pagan roots in so much.

      My 10 months here in Sevilla has changed my understanding of American culture. It's been a very enlightening time.

      Delete
  2. Love love love all the pageantry, though I agree bout the marching tunes
    And a glass of sangria would certainly help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bob:
      I never much liked sangria when it was big in the '70s, but I had a couple of glasses here a couple of months ago and it was much better than I thought. I would have needed quite a few to enjoy the music.

      Delete
  3. That's some title Mitch!

    What kind of toys were they selling?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chris:
      No wonder they go by Hermandad del Museo (or just Del Museo)!

      There were stuffed animals, mini ping pong and billiards, checker sets, toy race cars, water pistols... and then there were polo shirts, neck ties, tote bags, costume jewelry. It was all very exciting.

      Delete
  4. Sounds a little like the 'Salvation Army' bands around Christmas time......tinny!
    The flowered cross is really something else! The Spanish sure love to display their religious beliefs publicly....so unlike North Americans who keep it very private.
    Never a dull moment in the 'hood' Mitch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim:
      I have to give the band credit for sounding much better live than on the video. They really are very good... if you like that sort of music.

      Yes, they certainly display their religious traditions in much more public ways here than in the States. But, my legal rights are not challenged as a result of someone else's religious beliefs nor am I publicly insulted by politicians, so I can be more objective (and less defensive) about religion. Besides, I love a parade!

      Delete
  5. They have "block parties" almost every day, don't they? It is not surprising that people are happier in Europe...they take the time to get together, have outdoor meals, or parties. Gee, I miss Europe.

    saludos,
    raulito

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gee, St Paul has the Winter Carnival and the Taste of Minnesota on the Fourth of July. Are we boring or what!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ms. Sparrow:
      Oh, I love St. Paul (http://mitchellismoving.blogspot.com.es/2011/06/from-st-paul-to-minnehaha-falls.html)! Besides, doesn't the Winter Carnival run ALL winter (i.e., from September to May)?!?

      Delete
  7. Sometimes when I read your blog, I feel like you are always celebrating something.

    Like Christmas every week...

    ReplyDelete
  8. THe Catholic Church is one big "If you can't squash'em, then incorporate them" I rather like all the pagan roots in the religion. It makes sense from a Jungian point of view; sensible not hypocritical to do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ur-spo:
      And from a Freudian point of view, what would that Maypole be?

      Delete
    2. It was and remains a male fertility rite.

      Delete
  9. Good gravy, Sir! The church certainly lays on enough events to keep her subjects busy in Seville! What are they doing elsewhere while they distract you all with these festivals? ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Owl Wood:
      I know the nuns bake Christmas goodies. I think the rest of the time they're all supposed to be feeding the poor and doing good works. Here's hoping. (Maybe I'll stay behind during the next event and do some spying.)

      Delete
  10. This would be a good entry for a game of "museum name or Fiona Apple album title."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jenners:
      The museum wisely is simply Museo de las Bellas Artes (Museum of Fine Arts). It's the brotherhood that has the highfalutin name. (But it would still work.)

      Delete

Tell me what you're thinking...
Dime tus pensamientos...