Saturday, May 26, 2012

Duo Tapas with Tres Guapas... and Rode Estigwar

"Guapa" is an endearing way to say "beautiful" and San Geraldo and I had the pleasure of being with three guapas last night. We spent the evening with Teré, along with Paula and Adela, who also work downstairs at El Sanedrín and who have also made us feel like Sevilla is truly home. Paula and Adela recently became roommates and live in the nearby cool neighborhood of La Alameda. They suggested we meet for dinner around nine last night.

DOS GUAPAS.
PAULA (LEFT) MOONING ABOUT METALLICA. ADELA ENVYING HER DAY IN MADRID.

So, Teré came by after work to visit her nephews the cats. And we three then met Paula and Adela in La Alameda and walked together to Duo Tapas. It's located in a charming little plaza in front of a small chapel. The food was exceptional and inexpensive. The service was perfect. The atmosphere, relaxing.

CHAPEL OF [QUICK INHALE] HERMANDAD SANTA CRUZ DEL RODEO Y NUESTRA SEÑORA DEL CARMEN.
SINCE 1502.

Paula and Adela both speak a little English, but they haven't used it much. So, they speak mostly Spanish and I translate for Jerry if he doesn't follow something. (He follows a lot.)

SAN GERALDO (IN GREEN WITH BACK TO THE CAMERA). SPEAKING WITH HIS ENTIRE BODY.

DELICIOUS POTATOES IN SALSA.
IT WASN'T EASY GETTING SAN GERALDO AND PAULA TO SHARE WITH THE REST OF US.

TERE A LA TEMPURA.
BOTH DELICIOUS.

Paula headed to Madrid this morning to see a Metallica concert. She loves music and told us that she has seen and loves Rode Estigwar, as well. I asked, "Who?" And Teré repeated — shocked that I didn't recognize the name — "Rode Estigwar." Paula then played a bit of a song on her smart phone. We know Rode Estigwar better as Rod Stewart. They burst out laughing when they heard the correct pronunciation. Tere then said she'd have to call her mother who has always had a crush on the old-time actor, Estigwar Granhair. She thought her mother would be surprised to learn that his real name is Stewart Grainger.

17 comments:

  1. "Rode Estigwar."
    Priceless.
    And the food.
    I'm salivating.
    And the church.
    While not a religious man, per se, I do love churches.
    Great photos AGAIN!

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    1. Bob:
      I've never had such good tempura. We also had spring rolls and an incredible stacked plate of crusty bread, beef, ham, cheese, and I can't remember what else. Both dishes were gone before I could get my camera out of its case. Oh, time to go, Rode Estigwar is calling.

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  2. Hello Mitch:
    Could anything be better than enjoying excellent, inexpensive food, eaten outside on a warm, light evening in good, entertaining company? We think not.

    We do hope that you are both enjoying your weekend.

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    1. J&L:
      Yes, tapas in the open air is wonderful.

      We are enjoying our day... the only way we know it's a weekend is because the stores are closed tomorrow!

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  3. Ahhhhhhhhhh that is hilarious! It was good of them to be so good natured about realizing their pronunciations were off :) My French family (when I was an au pair) used to refer to Kowwwuh boooees. And when I would finally realize that they were, once again, trying to say, "cowboys", I would say, "Oh, COWBOYs" and they would laugh at my pronciation "à l'américain" :))

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    1. Judith:
      They've all laughed enough times at OUR mispronunciations. I love this one. I will never again think of Rod Stewart as anything but Rode Estigwar. And likewise Estigwar Grainhair.

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  4. I keep making the same mistake over and over...reading your blog in the morning before lunch. It makes me so hungry and so much in need for Spanish food.

    Here in this household they are almost strictly meat and potatoes...any variation like rice is an adventure for them.

    "Que os aproveche majo"

    saludos,
    raulito

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  5. Raulito:
    Sorry to put you through that, but at least you can cook something up!

    How does "Que os aproveche majo" translate in English?

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  6. I keep wondering, why do the Spaniards eat so late? Do they stay up late and sleep in the morning?

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    1. Ms. Sparrow:
      SOONKS is a wonderful source of information on Spanish culture, history, traditions, and more. I hope his response below helped. One thing Americans forget is that the tradition of siesta is still very common here (I first experienced it while spending time in Italy in the '70s). People start work in the morning and have a 2 or 3 hour break (siesta) sometime in the middle of the day (anywhere from 1:30 to 5:30). They then go back to work for another 2 or 3 hours. So the work day ends later for many people, which of course means dinner is later as well. Also, dining outside is very common throughout the year. Especially in the heat of summer, it's much better to wait until the air has cooled before going out to enjoy a meal.

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  7. Ms Sparrow.
    I do not think we sleep more or later, we have a feeding schedule is different from the rest of the world.
    I'll put an example of an office worker, that would start work at 8:30 or 9 am. have breakfast at 8 am. a coffee with milk some toast or a small sandwich, always at home or at the bar, not well seen eating in the street, at 2 pm. would have 2 hours to eat lunch is the most important meal of the day.
    would come out to work on the 18 or 19 pm. and dinner around 9 or 9:30 pm. and he would go to bed about 12 or 1 am.
    If a holiday or weekend, as normal is to be delayed 1 or 2 hours.
    I believe that the Spanish do not like dinner with sunlight.
    I start work at 6 am. and also have dinner at 9 pm

    Mitchell Sorry for taking ownership of your blog

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, SOONKS. Take over any time you like. Your insights are extremely helpful!

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    2. Hey, Thanks you guys for filling me in!

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  8. Hilarious!!! I hope Tere's mother takes it well! The tapas looks tasty!
    I Jerry French? You know how the French love to wave their arms when talking!

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    1. Jim:
      We haven't yet met Teré's mother but, by all accounts, she sounds like the type who will enjoy it. Jerry has I'm sure French blood in his ancient past and Italian, too. He has been known to knock out passersby on the street with his expressive arms. And here, when you don't speak the language, body language is very important.

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  9. It roughly translates "bon apetit handsome"

    But you know the word majo or maja as in "La Maja Desnuda" in the Prado Museum. "the beutiful nude one"

    saludos,
    raulito

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    Replies
    1. Raulito:
      I love your use of French to translate Spanish into English! Thanks for the lesson... from the beautiful nude one.

      Delete

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