Wednesday, September 11, 2013

To Market, To Market... To Buy a Fat Fig

No fat pigs here. Just lots and lots of fruit and vegetables, including figs. San Geraldo is living up to his saintly "sobriquet" (as Little Edie Beale would say). In fact, he's going to give Little Edie competition for her old sobriquet, "Body Beautiful," as well. Although "Body Beautiful San Geraldo" doesn't have the alliteration of "Body Beautiful Beale." He has adhered to his new eating plan, as of Monday had lost 19 pounds, and he has not complained once. He looks great, feels great, and is an inspiration.

HOW'S ABOUT A DATE?

San Geraldo had become known at the fruit store, Fruteria Ana Crespillo, at our Los Boliches municipal market before I started going along with him. Ana is the owner. During high season, her son and daughter work with her. With summer over, Ana or her son David work solo most days. They're a warm, charming family. Always smiling and joking. They brighten any day. Along with San Geraldo, I've now become a recognizable regular. I don't shop. I'm the "muscle." I've explained that I just take pictures and lug the bags home so San Geraldo can continue with the remainder of his grocery shop.

IN AUGUST, IT WAS ALL IN THE FAMILY.
(THAT'S ANA IN THE RED APRON; KIDS UP HIGH)
.

Ana regularly gives us things to enjoy while San Geraldo shops and I loiter — slices of watermelon, medjool dates; last week it was the most delicious dried figs we've ever had. The figs are here from one nearby grower only two weeks of every year. It's a good thing they won't be around much longer. I think I've had my quota.

IF YOU DON'T CARE A FIG FOR FRESH ONES...
...THE BEST DRIED FIGS, WHEN WE STILL HAD A BOWLFUL AT HOME.
LITCHI.  (OR LYCHEE OR LICHEE.)  I HAD NO IDEA HOW BEAUTIFUL THEY WERE.
CELERY ROOT. WHAT'S IT USED FOR?
REMEMBER MY LAST POST? SAN GERALDO CHOPS IT AND I TOSS IT IN THE TRASH.

DAVID ON HIS OWN TODAY.
PRICKLY PEAR.
HOME AGAIN. HOME AGAIN. JIGGITY JIG.

25 comments:

  1. That, Mitch, would be our kind of store/market! Lots of fresh to pick from. Love dates, figs, never tried litchi or prickly pear....yet.
    Good for San Geraldo! Always good to have that'muscle' around when you need it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim:
      I've only had litchi from a can (I assume) in Chinese restaurants served over ice. We both love it. I've never bought it fresh.

      The real reason I get to be muscle is so San Geraldo can go on with his shopping (which would be cooking for me).

      Delete
  2. Congratulations to San Geraldo for losing 19 pounds! He is, indeed, an inspiration. And what lovely produce from which to choose. Sure beats our local "supermarket".

    I saw a "dragonfruit" in our supermarket recently. Do you or San Geraldo know how it should be cooked/eaten? Or what it tastes like? It looks weird enough to be interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jo:
      Produce in Andalucía has been a joy. I don't think San Geraldo has ever bought dragonfruit. I'll ask!

      Delete
  3. Wow, what a wonderful set of photos of a wonderful place! Beautiful fresh produce! (Hey, in France they make a salad of chopped/shredded celery root, mixed with a creamy sauce-- Ken and Walt are big fans-- is that what Jerry was going to make?)

    Is Jerry's new eating style one that tries to be careful about the intake of starchy carbs?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Judeet:
      No creamy sauce for San Geraldo right now. He's been adding chopped celery root to other dishes he prepares. The program he's joined has him doing lots of fruits and vegetables and meat right now. There are a couple of different options he could have started with, and once he's reached his goal, he can start expanding his choices. There are so many plans that work. For him, it's the structure that really helps. This is great because he gets to eat a lot and doesn't feel deprived. (The program is called W8 Matters.)

      Delete
  4. These luscious photos make our fruit and vegetables look very sad, and generally they are. They are grown for how long they will keep and how well they will hold up when transported over long distances. While I have not had much experience in Europe, Japan puts our produce to shame.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew:
      I tried taking photos of fruit markets in Brooklyn the last time I was there, but they just didn't come out as joyful looking. Odd. But the produce here is definitely exceptional. I've had some fruit and vegetables here that have never been so good (Canary Islands bananas, those figs, carrots, even celery, to name just a few).

      Delete
  5. I'm just slightly jealous that you can buy Litchi there. I've always wanted to try fresh litchi but they are not to be had in Ohio, at least as far as I know. And how wonderful to make friends with the owners of such a great shop and have all that fresh fruit. Congratulations to your Sainted True Companion! (What I used to call Paul.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kristi:
      For you... we'll have to try some fresh litchi, I guess! We are getting to know so many of local shop and restaurant owners. It's a very small town feel.

      Delete
  6. I am mad jealous. I have never lived anywhere with easy access to fresh vegetables and fruits. What we get is not quality, and most of it rots before consumed, so it is not purchased often. Alas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Spo:
      You would go crazy here. Public markets are incredible. I'll have to check out the large public market in the center of Fuengirola. Also, the market in the old center of Málaga is beautiful. Lots more to make you mouth weater.

      Delete
    2. Spo... And, in addition to weatering, I think your mouth will WATER, too.

      Delete
  7. You can be guaranteed to get my juices flowing. Not just through your photos of plump and juicy fruits and veggies but your word-pictures are often mouth-watering enough without any visual assistance. (Why do pictures of food stalls abroad always look so much more colourful than they do at home?)

    Btw: I did try an egg-plant the other day. I sliced it, fried the slices moderately (my sister warned me about how much they absorbed the oil - and, boy was she right!), then let the slices cool, dipped them in batter and fried once more. Won't be trying it again in a hurry. The tastiest thing about it was the batter, which hardly clung to the slices anyway, and I ended up by frying more batter (with chopped onion mixed in) than what had been attached to the egg-plant slices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Raybeard:
      That eggplant sounds pretty awful, but you're much more daring in the kitchen than I would ever be. No recipe to follow? That would never happen! San Geraldo made his eggplant dish again yesterday. Phenomenal... again. I think you really should give it a shot.

      It's funny about the colorful food stalls. I mentioned in a reply above that I tried taking photos of the produce markets in Brooklyn and they didn't look at all as joyful. Lots of beautiful produce. Lots of color. I think they need the Spanish sun.

      Delete
  8. Ah, Mitch! When we lived in California (together), we would often visit our friend CHM who lived in Salton City then. Very nearby were fantastic date farms. We love dates! And there was a place or two that made date shakes, a true southern California delicacy! And figs, I love them fresh and dried. All the other produce looks fantastic as well. Ah, the south of Spain! You are spoiled! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, you lived in southern Cali as well. You must know about all that.

      Delete
    2. Walt the Fourth:
      When we lived in Palm Springs, we were surrounded by those amazing date farms. Hadley Orchards were famous for their date shakes. I tried one. Blech!

      The next time, I took someone's suggestion and tried the date and banana shake. Delicious! It would have been even better without the dates.

      Delete
  9. My grandparents had a fig tree and they loved eating figs and could hardly wait for them to ripen. I never cared for the taste or texture but it's been fifty years since I tried one so I should try again and see if my tastes have changed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stephen:
      Figs to me were always an "adult" food (like prune danish or cheese danish). Now that I'm almost an adult, I love them... especially when freshly dried and not dried out. I'm not a huge fan of fresh figs yet. Maybe in a few more years when I'm grown.

      Delete
  10. What a beautiful market and produce! And yay for the 19 lbs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Knatolee:
      It's a nice little space and the produce is so good. Yay for San Geraldo!

      Delete
  11. I too had no idea lychees were so beautiful. Prickly pears are something else where we live.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HK:
      LOL. Does "something else" mean their incredibly good or not the same as what I've got pictured? (I know there are larger and smaller and I've seen a variety of colors.)

      Delete

Tell me what you're thinking...
Dime tus pensamientos...