Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Totally Tubular

In December 2013, we bought a plant I found fascinating. (Click here if you'd like to see the original post.) The plant is a variety of Sansevieria (Snake Plant) called Sansevieria Cylindrica (Cylindrical Snake Plant). It started off in a tiny pot with nine cylindrical spears. It's now triple the original height, in a large pot, and has so many spears I haven't even bothered to try counting.

The snake plant I had had since my childhood took 25 years before it finally bloomed. Thereafter, it bloomed every year. This one took less than 2 years to grace us with its fragrant flowers. I guess it loves Fuengirola as much as we do. But, I've also learned that Sansevierias thrive on neglect. My old one was pot-bound and hadn't had enough water when it sent out it's first flowers.

Our cylindrical snake plant started out on the dresser in front of the bedroom window. It's outgrown the space and is now in the living room.

It turns out Sansevieria is also a great air purifier, removing toxins (like formaldehyde, benzene, and ammonia) from the air. I'm thinking of getting some other varieties and removing all the toxins from my life. (Oh, if that were all it took.)

STARTING TO BUD A FEW WEEKS AGO.
REACHING UP.
THE FLOWERS OPEN WIDE IN THE EVENING.
JUST ONE STEM FILLS THE LIVING ROOM WITH A SWEET, LIGHT FRAGRANCE.

26 comments:

  1. The name alone [Snake Plant] would terrify Carlos, but the fact that it thrives on neglect means it's the perfect plant for me!

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    1. Bob:
      It's also called African Spear. Does that help? If not, another common name for the traditional kind is "Mother-in-Law's Tongue."

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  2. We have one of the flat variety. I will have to look for the tubular type.

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    1. Michael:
      Let me know if you find it. I've still never seen it anywhere but our local IKEA. Very strange.

      Delete
  3. I have never seen this plant, Mitchell, but it is certainly healthy!

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    1. Linda:
      It's thriving. The original leaves (cylinders) are becoming solid like tree trunks.

      Delete
  4. It's amazing how long it takes for some plants to bloom. But then what's time to a plant?

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    1. Stephen:
      My first sansevieria was brought to my mother by my father the day I was born. It didn't bloom until a few years after it was given to me (first at university and then in my own apartment). I guess my mother was too good to it all those years before.

      Delete
  5. What a fascinating plant. If it thrives off of neglect, I could probably manage to keep it alive.

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    1. Robyn:
      I had a friend who claimed to kill silk flowers. I didn't believe her until I saw her silk flowers.

      Delete
  6. My best plants thrive on neglect :) and a bit of dog saliva (*fortunately he just licks them not eats them)

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    1. Cheapchick:
      We've been lucky with these two cats. They don't eat the plants. For some odd reason, however, they enjoy pulling pieces off a little cactus (which remains little because they keep pulling the pieces off)!

      Delete
  7. While I never had the tubular variety, the snake plants I used to have had those same while, aromatic blossoms (maybe once a year?)... anyway, I knew them to be called "mother-in-law tongues". I don't think that was meant as a compliment either ;-)

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    1. Sharon:
      Yep, mother-in-law's tongue is another name for those. Fortunately, the cylindrical one doesn't fit that description!

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  8. Mitchell I would like to have this one

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    1. Gosia:
      I wonder if you can find it where you are. Sansevieria is great and very easy to grow, but this cylindrical form appears to be hard to find.

      Delete
  9. So I guess the key is to treat it poorly and almost kill it so it feels it has to reproduce before it's too late!? Makes sense to me, sort of.
    I like this plant. I wonder just how long it would take to flower in our wonderful Nova Scotia climate?!!

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    1. Jim:
      Just like bougainvillea! I would think sansevieria could do very well in Nova Scotia. They make great houseplants. My old one didn't move outside until we moved to San Diego. We keep this new one indoors all the time.

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  10. I have seen snake plants in flower a few times, but had no idea the flowers were fragrant! I'll have to pay more attention. We have some with the flat leaves growing outside next to our back steps. Great photos. I wonder if it removes toxic people too?

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    1. Wilma:
      I was shocked when my old one began to bloom and the fragrance was so strong. As for toxic people, as far as I know, it hasn't worked for me yet.

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  11. This is most fascinating.
    Where does it put these alleged removed toxins? Into their leaves? The soil?

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    1. Spo:
      I have absolutely no idea. All in know is there are a large variety of plants that are used for this purpose. (Remember, I was an Art Major and Minors in Psych and English are no help on this subject.)

      Delete
  12. Very cool! I'll have to look for these... we have the "regular" kind that once belonged to Ken's grandmother. I've never seen it flower.

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    1. Walt the Fourth:
      I had never seen the cylindrical kind until that visit to IKEA, and I haven't seen it since.

      Delete
  13. I had no idea thank you for pointing that out, an air purifier, good idea.

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    1. Laurent:
      And the plants require so little care. You can't lose.

      Delete

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